Valentine's Day dinner recipes: The ultimate guide to surf and turf at home - NBC News

Valentine's Day dinner recipes: The ultimate guide to surf and turf at home - NBC News


Valentine's Day dinner recipes: The ultimate guide to surf and turf at home - NBC News

Posted: 13 Feb 2020 07:02 AM PST

On to the lobster!

How to make lobster tail at home

Lobster tail is a good way to go for surf and turf, since a) a plate can only hold so much, and b) if you're not in the mood for the dining workout that is involved in eating a full in-the-shell lobster, this is a more elegant presentation.

1. Buying and choosing lobster tail

Ask for cold water lobster tail (unless you have the intention of doing otherwise). It has an appealing firm texture, and a sweet, clean taste. Most of these lobsters in this country come from Maine and New Hampshire. Most lobsters are harvested between late June and the end of the year.

In a perfect world you'll get your lobster tail at a fish market, or a supermarket with a fish counter that has everything on ice and a robust turnover so you can be sure you are getting the freshest lobster. When you buy whole lobster, in general you want to buy live lobsters, but with tails that obviously isn't the case. Try to avoid lobster tail that is already packaged in the refrigerator section of the market. Price clubs often sell lobster tails packaged to order, and there are good online sources as well — read the reviews before ordering!

In short, the harder the shell the better. As with whole lobster, much depends on when in the molting phase the lobster was when caught. This means the lobster has fully filled out its shell, and you will get a larger amount of tender, sweet, firm meat.

Avoid lobster tails with any grayish discoloration, or dark spots, which could indicate decay. Make sure there is no yellowing of the meat itself. Look or ask to see if there is extra water or any other product injected into the lobster before buying. You want pure lobster meat.

2. Buying frozen lobster tail

More often than not, the lobster tails you see at the market, or the fish store, have been frozen, or are sold frozen. That's fine — most seafood in general is frozen at some point in order to maintain peak freshness, unless you are getting your seafood shipped overnight, or if you happen be right near the shore.

Baked Chicken With Potatoes, Cherry Tomatoes and Herbs Recipe - The New York Times

Posted: 10 Feb 2020 06:40 PM PST

For this simple bake of chicken, potatoes and tomatoes, Julia Moskin borrowed a technique from the Italian island of Ischia, where rosemary, fennel and other herbs grow wild in the hills. Because the island was formed by volcanic activity (Pompeii is just under 20 miles away), it has natural hot springs, and the sand on some of its beaches is as hot as 350 degrees. When cooking fuel was scarce and expensive, the islanders learned to use the sand as a heat source for cooking. Wrapping the ingredients tightly and subjecting them to steady heat produces a succulent, aromatic dish. If you prefer to brown the ingredients, take the final step of uncovering the pan.

Featured in: In Ischia, Italy, Cooking Is Done In The Sand, Not The Stove

Lincoln Park class provides families with healthy recipes, tips for healthy eating - Southgate News Herald

Posted: 13 Feb 2020 03:30 AM PST

Most people are aware they probably should eat healthier, but isn't healthy food more expensive and takes longer to prepare?

Not necessarily.

Lincoln Park Public Schools has partnered with Henry Ford Health System's Generation With Promise to host a six-week cooking and nutrition class for parents and families.

Cooking matters, an evidence-based curriculum from Share our Strength, is designed to teach parents with limited food budgets to shop for and prepare healthy meals.

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Lincoln Park Public Schools has partnered with Henry Ford Health System's Generation With Promise to host a six-week cooking and nutrition class for parents and families.

"These classes are a place where participants can rethink how they approach food, shopping, and cooking," said Matthew Nahan, community coordinator for Henry Ford Health System. "It is all about learning how to make small changes that add up. Cooking Matters makes these changes simple and approachable."

On Thursdays, 17 Lincoln Park parents and families met with a team of professional chefs and dietitians for two hours to learn the basics of meal preparation, grocery shopping, food budgeting and nutrition. Classes featured Spanish translators to ensure the district's Spanish-speaking families were also able to enroll in the class.

Each week, participants learned a new family friendly recipe, and took home a bag of groceries to practice the skills and techniques learned in class. Sample recipes included:

●Week 1: Chinese vegetables and rice.

●Week 2: Spaghetti and turkey meatballs.

●Week 3: Stovetop macaroni and cheese.

●Week 4: Chicken with apples and raisins.

●Week 6: Black bean brownies.

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Each week, participants learn a new family friendly recipe, and take home a bag of groceries to practice the skills and techniques learned in class.

There was no cooking during the fifth week of class. Instead, participants met at a grocery store for an interactive and educational activity. Each participant received $10 and was challenged to purchase as much food as possible, including one item from each food group, without going over budget. The person who came closest to $10 won a prize.

"Cooking Matters is an amazing program, and we are thankful to Henry Ford Health System for providing this interactive learning opportunity for our parents and families," said Mandy Mercer, Lincoln Park Public Schools nurse consultant. "This innovative program is so valuable to our families by teaching parents to make healthy, nutritious meals that are affordable and quick to prepare. These are skills that will have long-lasting positive benefits on our students and their families."

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Stovetop macaroni and cheese was one of the sample recipes.

The class, which was at full capacity, launched Jan. 9 and ran until Feb. 13. To learn more about the Cooking Matters class, visit www.cookingmatters.org.

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